Britain’s Got Talent 2018 winner Lost Voice Guy might have lost his voice to cerebral palsy, but he hasn’t let that take a toll on his funny bones.

After challenging his comedy hero Ross Noble to a Stephen Hawking impersonation battle in 2012, Lost Voice Guy, armed with his voice synthesiser and an impressive catalogue of jokes, has taken the comedy circuit by storm.

I read that if you won BGT, you would buy a Geordie voice for your synthesiser. Surely the temptation must be to get a range of voices for different situations?

Lost Voice Guy: It would be quite nice not to sound like a posh version of Robocop anymore. Then again, I’ve had a voice similar to the one I have currently for most of my life, so it might be weird to change it now. Anyway, the posh accent makes my jokes funnier.

What effect do you think your win will have on the way that disability is viewed by the general public?

Lost Voice Guy: I hope that by seeing disabled people like myself on national television, some of the stigma will be taken away from disability. When I was growing up, I was always getting picked on because of my condition, but that was only because people didn’t understand properly. And that’s still a problem today. So I hope that people will get more used to disabled people if they see more of us on television.

By making fun of yourself, you give the audience permission to laugh at the absurdities of your condition. Do you think the audience’s relief at being allowed to laugh makes for bigger laughs?

Lost Voice Guy: Yes, I do think I get bigger laughs because the audience feels awkward at first. When I first walk on stage, they’re not sure what to expect or how to behave. Once they know it’s OK to laugh and that we’re all on the same side, they seem to enjoy themselves! 

How do you deal with hecklers at live gigs?

Lost Voice Guy: I’ve actually never been heckled yet. But I do have some comebacks stored just in case. I’m dying to use them! 

So much comedy depends on pauses and intonation. Do you need to program your synthesiser for comedic effect?

Lost Voice Guy: It was one of my main concerns when I first started doing stand up, and it’s still something I have to think a lot about. It’s slightly harder for me to stop in the middle of a joke and allow laughter. If I know a laugh is coming, I can get ready to pause it, but every audience is different. Sometimes I put random punctuation in a joke so that there’s time for people to laugh, too. It’s just a case of knowing how to use things to your advantage.

In your act, you explore how a person with a disability might use it to their advantage. There isn’t a right way to phrase this but what are the top three ‘perks’ to your condition? 

Lost Voice Guy:

  1. Getting a seat on the train, even when it’s busy.
  2. Getting out of an argument by pretending my batteries are dead.
  3. ALL THE FREE PARKING.

WHERE & WHEN

Lost Voice Guy: Inspiration Porn
Gilded Balloon Teviot, 1-26 August (not 13), 4pm, from £6

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